We have received excessive amounts of rain in the spring of 2013 causing many areas to flood. Too much water at the base of a tree can cause tree stress just like too little water causes tree stress. Some tree species adapt well to low lying areas like rivers beds, creeks and ponds and can withstand occasional flooding, but most tree species cannot.

Oak Tree with Galls

Trees as well as landscape shrubs and plants express signs of stress through changes in their foliage. The most common sign is yellowing, caused by a decrease in the amount of chlorophyll in their leaves. Yellow leaves are a stress sign of diseases, pests issues or water issues, lack of or too much of. Another common sign is browning of the leaves and this usually starts at the crown of the tree. Brown leaves can occur when the soil becomes completely saturated in prolonged conditions causing lack oxygen to the root systems. Without the proper balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide, root dieback begins which prevents the trees ability to absorb water, despite being saturated in water.

Unfortunately, there really isn’t anything practical to do during excessive water conditions. In the following months avoid having the same trees, landscape shrubs and plants become stressed again and consider deep root fertilizing this fall to help in the recovery process.

Sum it up

Trees as well as landscape shrubs and plants express signs of stress through changes in their foliage. While we can’t control the weather and the amounts of rainfall, we can try to avoid further stress of the same trees, landscape shrubs and plants become stressed again from other issues such as diseases, pests or lack of water.

It is always a good idea to consult with a lawn care professional and ask any questions you may have. Look around, ask friends or family, and research companies on the Better Business Bureau to find a company that you can trust.

TurfGator – Tree and Shrub Care:

Related Post